Ohiso Work & Projects

Green Door Magazine

Green Door Magazine

Over three years and 13 issues, Ellie Ohiso and Akira Ohiso co-founded the popular quarterly niche print publication, Green Door Magazine.

Based in the central Hudson Valley of New York State, Green Door Magazine espoused the benefits of country living in a socially conscious society, while retaining an attachment to the realities of urban life. It was ‘a journal of responsible living,’ as the magazine profiled artists, residences, food, wine, local farms, events and the evolution of transplanted city-dwellers.

The editorial vision was that living away from big cities does not mean losing important values and elements of your lifestyle. The magazine targeted successful and success-minded New Yorkers seeking a more comfortable lifestyle without having to give up what matters. Green Door served a readership of local Catskills and Hudson Valley residents and second-home owners, primarily based in and around Metro New York City.


Green Door Magazine’s editorial content informed city dwellers about the quality of rural life and communal principles and encouraged interaction and participation among those who have sought out country life for a primary or secondary residence. Green Door Magazine was not NY unplugged, as much as it was NY wireless, a seamless part of a greater New York State.

http://www.greendoormag.com

The Next One Won't Be Biblical

The Next One Won't Be Biblical

On September 21, 2014, the largest climate march in history occurred. The People's Climate March created a global marketing campaign in the weeks leading up to the march, and created a design contest juried by the likes of Shepherd Fairey, Moby, Swoon and more.

Among several hundred submissions, the Ohisos' poster design "The Next One Won't Be Biblical" was chosen as the winning poster design. The Ohiso design dominated over 10% of NYC subway car advertising, and was tailored for worldwide distribution (for instance: showing Big Ben drowning on London subway cars with the same tagline.)

Various news outlets covered the design. And for a day the design took over The New York Times homepage.

Huffington Post (8/20/14)

Pacific Standard Magazine (11/21/14)

Photography For Girls

Photography For Girls

What if women had a say in which photographs represented them? What if the women’s faces and bodies were realistically portrayed? What if we heard from those women in their own words about being in front of the camera, their place in society and where they think we are headed?  

It all started when Catskills photographer Kelly Merchant happened upon an 1892 Cyclopedia excerpt entitled “Photography For Girls.” Text over a century ago lamenting that more women have not gone behind the camera as their delicate sensibilities were peculiarly suited to the art. Photography For Girls: Book One confronts these feminine stereotypes.

With photography by Merchant, interviews by Akira Ohiso and creative direction by Ellie Ohiso, 13 women of various ages, races and professions are photographed and interviewed. The result is an honest, unfiltered look into a woman’s world. 

Exquisite Corpse of the Catskills

Exquisite Corpse of the Catskills

In partnership with the Catskill Arts Society, the Ohisos created a community-driven, interactive exhibition entitled Exquisite Corpse of the Catskills. It included an open call to visual artists of the Catskills and Hudson Valley of New York State to participate in a parlor game turned art exhibition modeled after the Surrealist game Exquisite Corpse.

The exhibition garnered local press in The River ReporterWatershed Post and Catskill Made. Exhibition ran June 5 to August 2, 2015.

http://www.watershedpost.com/2015/surrealist-art-project-exquisite-corpse-catskills

Smelting

Smelting

Akira Ohiso’s art installation brings attention to the history of the river as a fertile fishery for the Duwamish Native tribe. The shallow banks of Longfellow Creek once supported smelt, but they slowly disappeared with the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent proliferation of chemicals and toxic waste. Ohiso created drawings of native smelt – in red, yellow, black, and blue – that were then digitally printed onto white windsocks to create fish kites. In the artist’s Japanese culture, fish kites (Koinobori) are flown on poles to celebrate an annual national Children’s Day – symbolizing hope for a healthy and prosperous future for children. This year also marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese-American internment camps, adding poignancy to the installation.

Statement by the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture

Callicoon Farmers' Market

Callicoon Farmers' Market

New look, new outlook. The Sullivan County Area Farmers' Market wanted to be rebranded as the Callicoon Farmers' Market without losing their customers' positive association with the market.

The look was to be close to the previous branding while giving it a fresh perspective.

The rebranding consisted of an updated logo, new website, new email marketing , updated print materials and social media management.

Source – http://www.callicoonfarmersmarket.org

Art Lib

Art Lib

The Ohisos were one of the founding members of ArtLib, a revitalization project committed to organizing public art exhibitions and cultural projects to promote community revitalization and economic opportunity. Our first public work of art, Ed by artist Zac Shavrick, went up in Winter 2013.

https://www.facebook.com/artlibertyny/

Sideshow: Cooper Boone

Sideshow: Cooper Boone

Award-winning music artist Cooper Boone released his third studio album in early 2015. The Ohisos created a limited-edition glossy magazine for distribution with his new album. The creative look and feel for the imagery was guided by the Ohisos. They were also responsible for re-branding his website to coincide with the album launch, as well as LP design.

http://www.cooperboone.com

Beaverkill Studio

Beaverkill Studio

Beaverkill Studio, a film production studio launching late 2015 in the Catskills' Parksville, NY, came to Ellie and Akira for a complete rebranding. RJ Baker, studio head, was looking for a fresh logo, website and social media presence that reflected the studio's nod to mid-century design.

http://www.beaverkillstudio.com

Before I Die - Liberty

Before I Die - Liberty

The Ohisos launched a public art project on Main Street in Liberty, NY to engage the community in the future of a major building. The wall asked the community their thoughts. The walls read, "I would like this storefront to become..." in both English and Spanish. This wall was born in January 2013 and is featured on the Before I Die website. The project garnered a lot of local media attention.

http://beforeidie.cc/site/liberty/

For The Generations

For The Generations

The Ohisos assisted The Delaware Riverkeeper Network, a non-profit organization working to protect the Delaware River Watershed, to develop and launch For The Generations, a new initiative that aims to motivate citizens to demand and secure Environmental Rights Amendments in their states. Assignments include logo and web design and development, social media campaign creation, collateral marketing materials, and ongoing outreach efforts.

http://www.forthegenerations.org

Barryville Farmers' Market

Barryville Farmers' Market

The Barryville Farmers' Market, founded in 2005, wanted a new look for their 10th Anniversary. The popular Catskills-based Farmers' Market turned to OHISO for new branding. The rooster logo consists of a watercolor by local artist Alexandra Augustine. The tagline Where Every Farmer Knows Your Name and website design is a nod to the small-town feel and farmer to consumer (F2C) connections the market creates. 

Source – http://www.barryvillefarmersmarket.com

Surviving

Surviving

This graphic work of non-fiction, published in 2008, explores the concept of ‘surviving’ in terms of what it means to be Jewish. Surviving takes an intimate look into the stories of related Jews on both sides of a century and the horror settled in between.

The Jewish Book Council called it "a book that is a pleasure to hold, read, look at, and absorb." Deborah Lipstadt called it "moving, understated and powerful." It also garnered a feature length editorial in the September 2011 issue of Asian Jewish Life.

Available on Amazon.

Synopsis: Akira Ohiso, half-Japanese half-Irish, is a recent convert to Judaism. As a new Jew, he struggles with his role within the religion and in the face of a fresh fear, anti-Semitism. Through the process of conversion, Akira learned his maternal great-grandfather, Jules, was a silent Jew that suppressed his Jewish identity. After his death, the family found a simple Kiddush cup, a vestige of a hidden past. At the time of his conversion, Akira helped Holocaust survivors continue to survive. The book represents the triumvirate of endurance: Akira’s struggle with Judaism and Jules’ reemergence set against the backdrop of Akira’s retelling of Holocaust stories.